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Benjamin E. Mays Lecture Series Event Info

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Click this photo to read a full review of the nights' events!

When: Feb. 21, 2017
Where: Student Center East Ballroom
55 Gilmer St., Atlanta, GA 30303

A reception will be held prior to the lecture from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. and goes until 8:00 p.m.

Free and open to the public

Dr. Joyce E. KingJoyce E. King holds the Benjamin E. Mays Endowed Chair of Teaching, Learning and Leadership at George State University, where she is Professor of Educational Policy Studies and affiliated Faculty in the Department of African and African American Studies.

Her research and scholarship deal with how mainstream American education produces dysconsciousness that resists a critically transformative understanding of race and racialized inequity. Education K-16 perpetuates a curriculum that alienates peoples of color from seeing themselves as co-constructors of knowledge and distorts White people’s humanity as well. For example, Dr. King’s research has noted that K-12 textbooks, lesson plans, and teacher preparation routinely start the history of Black people in slavery, not in Africa, and teach that Egypt is located in the Middle East or even Asia rather than in Africa! African American learners are taught they have contributed nothing to the production of knowledge, and that abandonment of all Black cultural identity is key to any success in school. Her scholarship addresses a transformative role for culture in effective teaching and teacher preparation, Black Studies epistemology and curriculum theorizing, community-mediated research, and dysconscious racism, the term she coined. Her scholarship emphasizes cultural well-being as a necessary goal in all successful education, including that of Whites who are mis-educated as well by a competitive educational system that feeds them racially-constructed knowledge as color-blind education.

Her publications can be found in the Harvard Educational Review, The Journal of Negro Education, The Journal of Black Studies, Womanist Theory and Research, numerous book chapters as well as six books: Teaching Diverse Populations; Black Mothers to Sons: Juxtaposing African American Literature with Social Praxis; Preparing Teachers for Diversity and Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century; Re-membering History in Student and Teacher Learning: An African-centered Culturally Informed Praxis; and Dysconscious Racism, Afrocentric Praxis and Education for Human Freedom—Through the Years I Keep on Toiling—The Selected Works of Joyce E. King.

Previously, Dr. King has also served as Provost and Professor of Education at Spelman College, Associate Provost at Medgar Evers College in New York (CUNY), Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Diversity Programs at the University of New Orleans; Director of Teacher Education at Santa Clara University, and Head of the Department of Ethnic Studies, Mills College. Dr. King has international experience teaching, lecturing and providing professional development in Brazil (using Portuguese translations of her publications), Canada, China, England, Jamaica, New Zealand, Mali, Kenya, and Senegal. A recipient of the W.K. Kellogg Fellowship and the American Council on Education Fellowship, she also served on the California State Board of Education Curriculum Commission.

She holds the Ph.D. in the Social Foundations of Education and a B.A. Degree (with Honors), both from Stanford University, and a Certificate in Educational Management from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Dr. King is immediate past-President of the American Educational Research Association (2014-2015).

Benjamin Mays“It must be borne in mind that the tragedy of life does not lie in not reaching your goal. The tragedy of life lies in having no goal to reach.” – Benjamin E. Mays

In the spring of 1988, the Benjamin E. Mays Chair of Urban Educational Leadership was approved by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia and established in the College of Education at Georgia State University. Its goal was and continues to be the improvement of the quality of educational institutions in urban areas of the country, with special emphasis on the problems faced by the leadership of large city school districts.The founding holder of the Chair, Dr. Alonzo A. Crim, initiated the organization and sponsorship of the annual Benjamin E. Mays Memorial Lecture Series. It began in 1989 with Dr. Charles V. Willie, social scholar at Harvard University, and has continued to this past year’s lecturer, Dr. Jeannie Oakes. By continuing to bring nationally prominent educators to Atlanta, each symposium, conference and lecture encourages the discussion of issues facing urban educational leaders.

This program not only honors the memory of Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, but also promotes his philosophy of educational excellence for those typically least served by society.

Noma LeMoine, Ph. D., is the Chief Educational Officer (CEO) and sole proprietor of LeMoine and Associates Educational Consulting, a company dedicated to assuring excellence in education for traditionally underperforming students including Standard English Learner (SEL) populations.

Headshot of Noma LeMoineDr. Noma LeMoine’s career in education spans 35 years. She is a nationally recognized expert on issues of language, literacy acquisition and learning in African American and other Standard English Learner (SEL) populations. She has written and spoken extensively on the topic and is a highly sought-after consultant to colleges, universities, and school districts nationwide.

Dr. LeMoine’s vast experience in education includes serving as a Language and Speech Consultant to Headstart Programs with primary responsibility for training early education teachers in instructional strategies that promote language and literacy acquisition in inner city pre-school students. She has served as a classroom teacher and “Mentor Teacher” and a Language, Speech and Diagnostic Specialist. Dr. LeMoine has over 25 years of experience in administrative positions including serving as program Administrator and Coordinator of the Los Angeles Unified School district’s Speech, Language and Aphasia Programs, and as Principal, Investigator and Director of Operations of the NASA funded Maxine Waters Saturday Academy for Student Advancement in Math, Science and Communications a proposal she wrote and was awarded $600,000 by NASA to implement. Dr. LeMoine has served over 10 years as Adjunct Professor at California Universities and colleges, two years as Commissioner on Education for the California Speech, Language and Hearing Association, and ten years as a member of the National Citizen’s Commission on African American Education, an arm of the Congressional Black Caucus Ed Brain Trust.

For twenty years, Dr. LeMoine served as Director of the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Academic English Mastery Program (AEMP). The AEMP implemented in 81 schools, is a comprehensive, research-based program designed to address the language acquisition and learning needs of Standard English Learner (SEL) populations. The Program supported teachers, administrators, and paraeducators in effectively incorporating culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogy into core instruction. Under Dr. LeMoine’s visionary leadership, the Academic English Mastery Program became the national model for addressing the language, literacy and learning needs for African American and other students for whom Standard English is not native. The Program has been featured on 60 Minutes, in periodicals including Education Week and Teacher Magazine, in the PBS Documentary “Do You Speak American” and has been lauded by linguists as the exemplary instructional model for addressing the language acquisition needs of African American Standard English Learners (SELs).

Dr. LeMoine also served ten years as Director of the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Closing the Achievement Gap Branch. In this role, she oversaw implementation of the District’s closing the achievement gap initiatives intended to eliminate disparities in educational outcomes for under-achieving students. During this period the district saw improved academic achievement scores in both African American and Latino/Hispanic student populations.

She holds a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Southern California with a specialization in Language, Literacy, and Learning, a Master’s degree in Language and Speech Pathology and Audiology from California State University at Los Angeles, a second Master’s degree in Education, and a third Master's degree in Practical Theology.

Dr. LeMoine’s research interests and expertise include language and literacy acquisition in Standard English learner (SEL) populations and methodologies for improving language acquisition and learning in culturally and linguistically diverse students. Dr. LeMoine writes curriculum, designs and conducts professional development for teachers, administrators, paraeducators, and parents and consults with institutions of higher learning and K-12 schools relative to advancing learning in SEL populations. She has conducted short courses, seminars, and been guest lecturer at Colleges and Universities throughout the United States and Canada, including Harvard and Stanford Universities, Dartmouth College, the University of California at Berkeley, and at Los Angeles, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis, and others. Dr. LeMoine has served on numerous California State Department of Education committees including over 5 years with the Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Her work has taken her on educational exchanges to Africa, India, China and the Caribbean.

Dr. LeMoine has received many professional honors including, the California Speech, Language and Hearing Association, “Outstanding Achievement Award” (1988), the “Lois V. Douglass, Distinguished Alumnus Award” from the Department of Communication Disorders at California State University, Los Angeles, 1991, and in April of 1992, Dr. LeMoine was named Fellow of the California Speech Language and Hearing Association, one of the organization’s highest honors. In June of 1995, Noma was the recipient of the NAACP. Legal Defense Fund’s “Black Woman of Achievement Award” and in 1997, Mount St. Mary’s College awarded Dr. LeMoine the “Cultural Fluency Award” in recognition of outstanding contributions to the development of cross-cultural understanding in the Los Angeles Community. In June of 2005, the Association of California School Administrators bestowed upon Dr. LeMoine the Region XVI Valuing Diversity Award for her work in Los Angeles Unified School District toward closing the achievement gap and in February of 2008, the Southern graduation capCalifornia Chapter of the California Alliance of African American Educators bestowed upon Dr. LeMoine, the Asa G. Hilliard III, “Will to Educate Award” for distinguished service on behalf of African American students. In June 0f 2009, Dr. LeMoine was honored with the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education “2009 Trailblazers Award” and in November of 2009 she was the recipient of the “Distinguished Educator Award” from the Southern California Affiliate of the National Council of Negro Women.

For more information on Dr. Noma LeMoine, please click on her Curriculum Vita

List of Guest Lecturers for:

The Benjamin E. Mays Memorial Lecture Series — Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence

1989 Charles Willie, Social Scholar, Harvard University

1990 Samuel Cook, President, Dilliard University

1991 Samuel Proctor, Professor Emeritus, Rutgers University

1992 Julius S. Scott, President, Paine College

1993 Lerone Bennett Jr., Executive Editor, Ebony Magazine

1994 Maynard H. Jackson, Mayor Emeritus of Atlanta

1995 Lisa Delpit, Benjamin Mays Chair for Urban Educational Leadership, Georgia State University

1996 Barbara Sizemore, Dean, College of Education, DePaul University

1997 Asa G. Hilliard, Fuller E. Callaway Professor of Urban Education, Georgia State University

1998 Robert Franklin, President, Interdenominational Theological Center

1999 Jackie Jordan-Irvine, Charles Chandler, Professor of Urban Education, Emory University

2000 Vincent Harding, Professor Illif College

2001 Johnetta Cole, President, Spelman College

2002 Beverly Tatum, President, Spelman College

2003 Gloria Ladson Billings, Professor, University of Wisconsin

2004 Joyce King, Benjamin Mays Chair for Urban Education, Georgia State University

2005 Beverly Hall, Superintendent, Atlanta Public Schools

2006 Ronald Ferguson, Economist, Harvard University

2007 Mark Alexander, Endocrinologist, Kaiser Permanente

2008 Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and President of the Children’s Defense Fund

2009 Robert Moses, Founder of the Algebra Project

2010 Ela Gandhi, Durban University of Technology

2011 Vanessa Siddle Walker, Emory University

2012 Adelaide Sanford, Former Vice Chancellor New York State Board of Regents

2013 Brian Stevenson, Equal Justice Initiative

2014 Jeannie Oakes, Professor Emerita, UCLA, AERA President Elect

2015 Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 Visitor Parking is available Monday through Friday at M Deck, on a space-availability basis for a fee. During the first three weeks of Fall and Spring Semesters, visitor parking is very limited in all designated visitor locations.

The M deck is located at Auditorium Place and is restricted to students parking with a semester permit, reserved staff/faculty, day care drop off and visitors to the university. Daily parking is available to students and visitors with either cash or budget card.

M Deck Semester permits along with Lofts Deck (non-resident) permits are available for a fee per semester at the beginning of each semester to students on a first-come, first-served basis.

When: Nov. 11, 2015
Where: GSU Student Center East Ballroom
55 Gilmer St., Atlanta, GA 30303

A reception will be held prior to the lecture from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. and goes until 8:00 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

Dr. Joyce E. KingJoyce E. King holds the Benjamin E. Mays Endowed Chair of Teaching, Learning and Leadership at George State University, where she is Professor of Educational Policy Studies and affiliated Faculty in the Department of African and African American Studies.

Her research and scholarship deal with how mainstream American education produces dysconsciousness that resists a critically transformative understanding of race and racialized inequity. Education K-16 perpetuates a curriculum that alienates peoples of color from seeing themselves as co-constructors of knowledge and distorts White people’s humanity as well. For example, Dr. King’s research has noted that K-12 textbooks, lesson plans, and teacher preparation routinely start the history of Black people in slavery, not in Africa, and teach that Egypt is located in the Middle East or even Asia rather than in Africa! African American learners are taught they have contributed nothing to the production of knowledge, and that abandonment of all Black cultural identity is key to any success in school. Her scholarship addresses a transformative role for culture in effective teaching and teacher preparation, Black Studies epistemology and curriculum theorizing, community-mediated research, and dysconscious racism, the term she coined. Her scholarship emphasizes cultural well-being as a necessary goal in all successful education, including that of Whites who are mis-educated as well by a competitive educational system that feeds them racially-constructed knowledge as color-blind education.

Her publications can be found in the Harvard Educational Review, The Journal of Negro Education, The Journal of Black Studies, Womanist Theory and Research, numerous book chapters as well as six books: Teaching Diverse Populations; Black Mothers to Sons: Juxtaposing African American Literature with Social Praxis; Preparing Teachers for Diversity and Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century; Re-membering History in Student and Teacher Learning: An African-centered Culturally Informed Praxis; and Dysconscious Racism, Afrocentric Praxis and Education for Human Freedom—Through the Years I Keep on Toiling—The Selected Works of Joyce E. King.

Previously, Dr. King has also served as Provost and Professor of Education at Spelman College, Associate Provost at Medgar Evers College in New York (CUNY), Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Diversity Programs at the University of New Orleans; Director of Teacher Education at Santa Clara University, and Head of the Department of Ethnic Studies, Mills College. Dr. King has international experience teaching, lecturing and providing professional development in Brazil (using Portuguese translations of her publications), Canada, China, England, Jamaica, New Zealand, Mali, Kenya, and Senegal. A recipient of the W.K. Kellogg Fellowship and the American Council on Education Fellowship, she also served on the California State Board of Education Curriculum Commission.

She holds the Ph.D. in the Social Foundations of Education and a B.A. Degree (with Honors), both from Stanford University, and a Certificate in Educational Management from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Dr. King is immediate past-President of the American Educational Research Association (2014-2015).

Benjamin Mays“It must be borne in mind that the tragedy of life does not lie in not reaching your goal. The tragedy of life lies in having no goal to reach.” – Benjamin E. Mays

In the spring of 1988, the Benjamin E. Mays Chair of Urban Educational Leadership was approved by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia and established in the College of Education at Georgia State University. Its goal was and continues to be the improvement of the quality of educational institutions in urban areas of the country, with special emphasis on the problems faced by the leadership of large city school districts.The founding holder of the Chair, Dr. Alonzo A. Crim, initiated the organization and sponsorship of the annual Benjamin E. Mays Memorial Lecture Series. It began in 1989 with Dr. Charles V. Willie, social scholar at Harvard University, and has continued to this past year’s lecturer, Dr. Jeannie Oakes. By continuing to bring nationally prominent educators to Atlanta, each symposium, conference and lecture encourages the discussion of issues facing urban educational leaders.

This program not only honors the memory of Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, but also promotes his philosophy of educational excellence for those typically least served by society.

Sonia NietoDr. Sonia Nieto has devoted her professional life to questions of diversity, equity, and social justice in education. A native of Brooklyn, New York, she began her teaching career in 1966 in an intermediate school in Brooklyn, moving two years later to P.S. 25 in the Bronx, the first fully bilingual school in the Northeast. Her first position in higher education was as Instructor in the Department of Puerto Rican Studies at Brooklyn College where she taught courses in bilingual education for preservice and practicing teachers. Moving to Massachusetts with her family to pursue doctoral studies in education at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, she received her degree in 1979 with specializations in curriculum, multicultural education, and bilingual education. After working for the Massachusetts Department of Education for a year, she accepted a faculty position at her alma mater where she remained for 25 years, retiring as a full professor.

Professor Nieto’s research focuses on multicultural education, teacher education, and the education of students of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, topics on which she continues to write and speak. She has written or edited eleven books including the best-selling Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education, a textbook widely used in teacher education programs around the nation and beyond. The first edition of Affirming Diversity (1992) was selected by the Museum of Education as one of the books that helped define the field of education in the 20th century, and it was featured in a 2015 online exhibit. She has also published dozens of journal articles and book chapters. Her memoir, Brooklyn Dreams: My Life in Public Education, will be published by the Harvard Education Press in 2015.

Dr. Nieto has received numerous awards for her scholarly work, teaching, and advocacy, including six honorary doctorates. In 1998, she was awarded an Annenberg Institute Senior Fellowship in Urban Education and in 2000, a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center in Italy. In 2008, she received the Social Justice in Education Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA), the premier professional organization for education researchers, and has also been elected as a Fellow of AERA. In addition, she was elected as a Laureate of Kappa Delta Pi honorary educational organization, a distinction limited to 60 living educators. She has been a Visiting Scholar at universities in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Spain and in 2012 she served as the Wits-Claude Distinguished Scholar at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dr. Nieto received the Medal of Distinguished Service, the highest honor given by Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2014. She was recently invited as an honoree for “Inside the Academy,” an online archive that recognizes the most influential scholars in education through their personal and professional histories. In addition, in 2015, she was elected as a member of the National Academy of Education.

Sonia Nieto is married to Angel Nieto, a poet, children’s book author, and former middle and high school teacher. They have three daughters and 12 grandchildren.

List of Guest Lecturers for:

The Benjamin E. Mays Memorial Lecture Series — Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence

1989 Charles Willie, Social Scholar, Harvard University

1990 Samuel Cook, President, Dilliard University

1991 Samuel Proctor, Professor Emeritus, Rutgers University

1992 Julius S. Scott, President, Paine College

1993 Lerone Bennett Jr., Executive Editor, Ebony Magazine

1994 Maynard H. Jackson, Mayor Emeritus of Atlanta

1995 Lisa Delpit, Benjamin Mays Chair for Urban Educational Leadership, Georgia State University

1996 Barbara Sizemore, Dean, College of Education, DePaul University

1997 Asa G. Hilliard, Fuller E. Callaway Professor of Urban Education, Georgia State University

1998 Robert Franklin, President, Interdenominational Theological Center

1999 Jackie Jordan-Irvine, Charles Chandler, Professor of Urban Education, Emory University

2000 Vincent Harding, Professor Illif College

2001 Johnetta Cole, President, Spelman College

2002 Beverly Tatum, President, Spelman College

2003 Gloria Ladson Billings, Professor, University of Wisconsin

2004 Joyce King, Benjamin Mays Chair for Urban Education, Georgia State University

2005 Beverly Hall, Superintendent, Atlanta Public Schools

2006 Ronald Ferguson, Economist, Harvard University

2007 Mark Alexander, Endocrinologist, Kaiser Permanente

2008 Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and President of the Children’s Defense Fund

2009 Robert Moses, Founder of the Algebra Project

2010 Ela Gandhi, Durban University of Technology

2011 Vanessa Siddle Walker, Emory University

2012 Adelaide Sanford, Former Vice Chancellor New York State Board of Regents

2013 Brian Stevenson, Equal Justice Initiative

2014 Jeannie Oakes, Professor Emerita, UCLA, AERA President Elect

2015 Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Visitor Parking is available Monday through Friday at M Deck, on a space-availability basis for a fee. During the first three weeks of Fall and Spring Semesters, visitor parking is very limited in all designated visitor locations.

The M deck is located at Auditorium Place and is restricted to students parking with a semester permit, reserved staff/faculty, day care drop off and visitors to the university. Daily parking is available to students and visitors with either cash or budget card.

M Deck Semester permits along with Lofts Deck (non-resident) permits are available for a fee per semester at the beginning of each semester to students on a first-come, first-served basis.